The Trail of the Wild Flowers, Part I

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The Trail of the Wild Flowers, Part I by Sandy Nellis Lane
The Trail of the Wild Flowers, Part I by Sandy Nellis Lane

Lucy Ladd Stratton combined her diaries, letters home and newspaper articles to compose this delightful memoir about her discovery of wild flowers to paint and her accompanying adventures. Upon Lucy’s death in 1936, her 1568 fragile, intricate watercolor and gouache wild flower paintings on construction paper were sent to the Library of Congress. Sandy Nellis Lane photographed many of the paintings to insert them into Lucy’s beautiful prose and after ten years of traveling and editing, she has published her great great aunt’s works.

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Description

Lucy Ladd Stratton combined her diaries, letters home and newspaper articles to compose this delightful memoir about her discovery of wild flowers to paint and her accompanying adventures. Upon Lucy’s death in 1936, her 1568 fragile, intricate watercolor and gouache wild flower paintings on construction paper were sent to the Library of Congress. Sandy Nellis Lane photographed many of the paintings to insert them into Lucy’s beautiful prose and after ten years of traveling and editing, she has published her great great aunt’s works.The-Trail-of-the-Wild-Flowers,-Part-I_jacket-3

Born in Dalton, New Hampshire near the Connecticut River in 1834, Lucy Ladd attended the Seminary of South Newbury Vermont for High School. In 1862, George Stratton and Lucy were married and lived in either Manchester, NH where he was a symphony director and composer or Boston, Massachusetts, as George was an importer of musical instruments with a Boston address. By 1872 they were living and traveling in Europe where Lucy was taking painting lessons in Germany and painting landscapes in oil and watercolors. It was in 1882 while spending the summer in South Newbury, Vermont, overlooking the familiar Connecticut River that Lucy started on her wild flower journey.

The Trail of the Wild Flowers, Part II, Europe and America, 1885-1890, 1902-1916 is on its way, Lucy continued her trail through France, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Austria (basically the Alps) and back to America – New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois and Colorado.

Additional information

Weight 1.5 lbs
Dimensions 9.25 x 6.25 x .75 in

1 review for The Trail of the Wild Flowers, Part I

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Ladd Stratton combined her diaries, letters home and newspaper articles to compose this delightful memoir about her discovery of wild flowers to paint and her accompanying adventures. Upon Lucy’s death in 1936, her 1568 fragile, intricate watercolor and gouache wild flower paintings on construction paper were sent to the Library of Congress. Sandy Nellis Lane photographed many of the paintings to insert them into Lucy’s beautiful prose and, after ten years of traveling and editing, she has published her great great aunt’s works.

    Born in Dalton, New Hampshire near the Connecticut River in 1834, Lucy Ladd attended the Seminary of South Newbury Vermont, for High School. In 1862, George Stratton and Lucy were married and lived in either Manchester, NH where he was symphony director and composer or Boston, Massachusetts, as George was an importer of musical instruments with a Boston address. By 1872 they were living and traveling in Europe where Lucy was taking painting lessons in Germany and painting landscapes in oil and watercolors. It was in 1882 while spending the summer in South Newbury, Vermont, overlooking the familiar Connecticut River that Lucy started on her wild flower journey.

    Review by Wanda Easter Burch, author of “She Who Dreams: A Journey into Healing through Dreamwork”:
    “Lucy’s charming artwork allows the reader to journey with her on her enchanting venture. From Vermont woodlands with fairy grottos to the land of ancient cathedrals, Shakespeare, Sir Walter Scott and Jane Austin; Lucy Ladd Stratton began her ‘Trail of the Wild Flowers,’ painting intricate watercolors of her prized acquisitions. Lucy was not afraid to go forth alone on long trails into woods and ravines, often seeking places described in her favorite books or journaled by her favorite writers and poets; but she preferred company.

    I was drawn immediately into the imagery of Lucy’s writing, the descriptions punctuated at exactly the right moment with exquisite paintings of the wildflowers she finds on her walks. Her prose is poetry; her poems delightful and provocative. Her accompanying stories draw you back to the wildflower you just hurriedly skimmed past.

    She reveled in the architecture of ancient Norman Cathedrals, comparing and contrasting the design of each and providing small lectures on pilgrims, saints – including the locations of their final resting places – and the winding trails and hidden glens near each that provided unspeakable delight and pleasurable surprises of rare plants and flora described by ancient botanists. Cathedrals were a symphony for her soul and background music for her delightful discoveries. Lucy had trouble deciding which she liked more – wild flowers, mountains or cathedrals.

    These are not sappy romantic stories one would expect from a late Victorian diary, but educated detailed descriptions of the trail she describes, deepened with imagination and study into the writings and cultural landscape of the period in which she lives.”

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